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Norwalk's new industry

• Feb 12, 2018 at 8:00 PM

Feb. 12, 1901

The top stories in the Norwalk Daily Reflector on this date in 1901: 

 

The C.W. Smith plant receives its first shipment tomorrow

Norwalk welcomes with pride and satisfaction any enterprise that gives employment to working people who earn their bread by their active brains and strong muscles. Within the past few days or weeks an enterprise has been started in Norwalk which bids fair to make our beautiful little city famous the world over.

Chas. W. Smith, a former well-known expert mechanic of Norwalk, who has been away from us for a number of years has returned to Norwalk with his excellent wife, and the two propose to make Norwalk their future home.

Mr. Smith has taken possession of his large brick factory on the corner of North Linwood Avenue and Monroe St., where he intends to do a business which will be the pride of the town and add comfort and happiness to many a Norwalk home.

This style of business in which Mr. Smith is to engage in and which has already been started, is the famous pyroetched work which has attracted attention and admiration among lovers of fine and novel art work. The work will embrace furniture, chairs, tables, etc., a specially designed line of novelties for halls, dens, libraries and parlors, such as stein racks, pipe racks, smokers’ tables jardiniere stands, tablets, ladies’ dressing tables, writing desks together with plaques, match safes, card and broom holders, key racks, etc., etc. Their line of work will be strictly original and all designed by Mr. Smith himself. The workmen employed will devote their entire time to this kind of work.

 

The lots sell rapidly and the steel plant is almost assured

The day for the great sale of steel plant lots opened bright and sunshiny and the expectant lot buyers were on hand bright and early and by nine o’clock the time fixed for the sale to begin, A.M. Beattie’s law office in the Gallup block was filled to overflowing with those who were intent on making prospective Greater Norwalk a reality.

Promptly at nine o’cock the sale began and in the first two hours, 150 lots were sold. At 11:30 a.m. an adjournment was taken for dinner and after dinner there was another crowd waiting.

Up to 3 o’clock, 180 lots had been purchased.

 

Death of Mrs. White

Mrs. D.A. White of North Pleasant Street died Sunday morning at the home of her daughter, in Hartland, after a brief illness with heart trouble superinduced by the grip. The remains were brought to the family home in Norwalk Sunday evening.

Mrs. White was a daughter-in-law of Mrs. Silence White, who died last week.

 

Worth of promotion

Frank Evans, son of Capt. B.F. Evans, of Fremont, and nephew of Geo. W. Evans, of Norwalk, who has been connected with the electric light plant at Chicago Junction for some time has been offered a lucrative position with a large electric light plant at Philadelphia. Frank is a Norwalk boy and we are glad to note that his genius and ability as electrician is fully appreciated.

 

Coming Tuesday -— Feb. 13, 1901: August Fegel passes away

— Compiled by Andy Prutsok

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