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Believe Japs came almost getting Norwalk LSE rails

• Jan 6, 2018 at 8:00 PM

Jan. 6, 1943

The top stories in the Norwalk Reflector-Herald on this date in 1943:

 

Feud with salvage Dept. over rail removal again strikes fire

Last night in the council room the feuding between Norwalk and the War Department over the proposal to rip nearly 400 tons of LSE rails from Norwalk’s Main Street truck fire again.

S.R. Murther of Cleveland, representing the salvage department, centered the controversy. As has been set forth before, the War Department has announced it will take the rails from Norwalk, but so far, it has failed to satisfy the city dads as to whether the street will be put in proper condition if the steel is taken up.

Server Wm. A Saladin, Britt Young acting city solicitor, Vice Mayor P.E. Weidemaier and Councilman Ed Esker fired one question after another at Murther and at the close of the meeting nothing had been said that would indicate a disposition on the part of the War Department to put the street in good condition.

 

Norwalk school board organizes

The Norwalk Board of Education met Monday evening for its annual reorganization meeting. The following officers were elected: Ray L. Gandolf, President; Mrs. Mildred M. Laning, Vice President; A.C. Elmer, clerk and purchasing agent.

 

F.E. Williamson, Norwalk native, willed $100,000

A news dispatch from Waukegan, Wis., discloses that Fredrick E. Williamson, president of the New York Central Railway, and a native of Norwalk, has been willed $100,000 from the $20,000,000 estate of the late Walter P. Murphy, who made his fortune in the railway supply business. The father of Mr. Williamson was one of the outstanding pastors of the Norwalk Presbyterian Church. There are 90 beneficiaries, chiefly railway executives and industrialists. Mr. Murphy died Dec. 16, in Los Angeles.

 

Mrs. C. Humphrey, beloved matron, called by death

Mrs. Charles D. Humphrey, born March 8, 1876, the daughter of Thomas and Jennie Oakley Hunt at Jordan, N.Y., died while sitting in a chair at her home, 14 Walnut Street, at 10:10 a.m. today. She had been in ill health several years, but her death was unexpected.

Mrs. Humphrey is survived by her husband, a son Ralph of Nashville, Mich., and Earl Stewart of Norwalk, a son by a former marriage. Her son Howard died eight years ago last November.

Mrs. Humphrey was a faithful member of the Church of Christ and previous to her illness had been a particularly efficient and valued operator on the local telephone exchange. She had a large number of friends and was highly regarded. Her death will be widely mourned in the community.

 

Coming Monday — Jan. 8, 1979: Carabin heads commissioners

— Compiled by Andy Prutsok

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