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Norwalk high but neighbors higher

• Aug 2, 2017 at 8:00 PM

Aug. 2, 1919

 

The top stories in the Norwalk Reflector-Herald on this date 98 years ago:

Food prices twice that of formerly

There is no talk of a grand jury food price investigation here. Prosecuting Attorney Frank Carpenter is on his vacation and will not return to the city until Monday.

Comparison of food prices charged in Norwalk and neighboring cities show quite a range in figures.

Staple commoditites such as meat and potatoes, seem to sell at about the same price in most markets, regardless of the size of the city. Eggs are relatively reasonable in price here. While local retailers are quoting eggs at 49 cents a dozen, 55 cents is charged in Lorain, 55 cents to 70 cents at Cleveland, 52 cents at Tiffin and 47 cents to 48 cents at Fremont.

Roast beef averages about 30 cents a pound in seven cities, including Norwalk, although at Sandusky the beef quotation is 25 cents.

  

Auto ‘fence’ at Willard

It is believed that an arrest made by Erie County officials has uncovered an automobile “fence” at Willard.

George Felder, who is now in the Erie County jail, has been bound over to the grand jury in the sum of $1,000 at Sandusky on the charge of stealing two automobiles in that city.

The statement is made that a Ford car stolen from H.C. Newman at Cedar Point recently was found in Felder’s possession at Willard.

Sheriff Clyde O. Roose has taken an active part in the case.

 

Theo. Timmins is hurt in runaway

Theodore Timmins, a Merchants’ Delivery employee, was badly hurt late yesterday afternoon when the horse he was driving ran away on Read Street. As the result of being thrown under the horse’s feet, Timmins suffered a severe cut over the right eye and numerous other injuries about the body.

After running a short distance on Read Street, the animal was stopped when the wagon became wedged between two trees.

 

Silver Star is awarded Lieut. B.C. Robinson

Mrs. E.M. Robinson of this city has received word from the government that her son, Lieut. B.C. Robinson of this city, has been awarded a silver star for bravery shown in action.

The following from the government records explains the honor:

“Lieut. Benjamin C. Robinson, 145th Inf.

“For gallantry in action near Warandg, Belgium, 31, October, 1918, in climbing to the roof of a nearby house and asking one of his men to give him a rifle, routed the machine gun crews.”

Lieut. Robinson enlisted here early in the war and was wounded five times.

 

Will go to their farm in Berkshires

Mr. and Mrs. C.F. Jackson, and daughter Mrs. Ione Johnson and her little son, will leave next Tuesday for Monterey, Mass., where they will spend the months of August and September at the Jackson farm in the Berkshire Hills, on the shores of Garfield Lake, Mr. Jackson’s son, E.E. Jackson of Findlay, and his daughter, will join them there.

 

Coming Thursday, Aug. 3, 1963: City boy covers plow match

— Compiled by Andy Prutsok

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