logo


no avatar

Work at new factory in Norwalk begins

• May 9, 2017 at 8:00 PM

May 9, 1907

The top stories in the Norwalk Evening Herald on this date 110 years ago:

 

$26,000 is now pledged toward proposed new Episcopal Church Building

The amount of money pledged for the new edifice to be built by St. Paul’s Episcopal Church has reached the sum of $26,000. 

The donations so far are in the following sums: $7,000, $5,000, $5,000, $5,000 and four  $1,000 pledges, one of the latter being from the ladies’ society of the church.

It looks now as though the $30,000 sought to be raised before work is commenced on the structure, will be forthcoming by the time summer is gone.

 

Busy hen on exhibition

The brood of chickens in the show window of the Lenox Cigar Store is attracting the attention of all who pass that way. A large buff rock hen and thirty little chickens have possession of the large show window and seem as much at home there as though they were in a rural district. The hen hatched twenty-one of the chickens, having been set on twenty-five eggs, an unusually large number.

 

Contractor makes preparation to resume paving of Benedict

W.S. Hadley of the firm of Hadley & Sons, who have the contract for the Benedict Avenue and East Main Street improvements, was in the city today making arrangements to begin work on the Benedict Avenue pavement, which was stopped last fall. He expects to start tomorrow and will import a large force of men and hustle the work to completion.

 

Wagner plant starts tomorrow

Ten girls will start work tomorrow morning at the new Wagner awning factory, and as many more will be started in as soon as the machines, which arrived yesterday, can be placed in position.

The beginning tomorrow closely follows out the announcement made several weeks ago that the company would begin work about May 1. The delay was caused by a mistake in the shipping orders by the Davis Sewing Machine Company of Dayton.

It is the intention of the company to increase the plant here as rapidly as machines can be secured which will probably lead to the establishment here of its entire plant, which will mean the employment of about 125 girls, each earning from ten to fourteen dollars a week. In the latter event the company will still retain its office and salesroom in Cleveland.

 

Coming Wednesday — May 10, 1907: Frank Eker discharged

— Compiled by Andy Prutsok

Recommended for You