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Local siblings still ruling the links

By DON HOHLER • Jun 14, 2017 at 1:30 PM

Arguably, the strongest brother-sister team ever to play at the Elks Club, Curt and Kelly Everman, made an appearance two weeks for the playing of the Norwalk Health Foundation fund-raiser. And both would show they still have game, Curt playing on the winning A Division team while his sister had an equally memorable day in being re-united with two other former club champions.

Curt, 56, was labeled as one of the premier players at the old Elks 9-hole course. He was second to Larry Carpenter (10 titles) in total club championships with five. He may have been the only player at the Elks to make five finals and win all five.

“Mom and Dad played golf and I got hooked on the game right off the bat,” Everman admitted. “Also helping was we had a very good high school team, one coached by Jerry Emmons. We played our way to the state tournament in 1978. Bob Warner and I alternated as the No. 1 player with George Peckham, Tom Albright and Bill Rafie.“

Everman went to Wooster College for one year and then transferred to Toledo where he graduated with a degree in Business.

“I was fortunate enough to get a job offer in the insurance business in Florida 16 years ago. It worked out well, in the end the agency having something like 700 clients,” he explained.

“Our (wife, Pamela) parents are not getting any younger so we decided to move back to Ohio and spend some quality time with them,” Everman offered.

As far as golf, he admitted he traded the fairways for the ocean while in Florida. “Got into boating. Played very little golf and that will probably be the case when I relocate back here. I am still competitive but that’s about all,” he assessed.

Everman was competitive right out of high school. In 1979 at 18 years old, he beat Dan Myntti, 8&7 for his first title. It was 1986 when he stopped another seasoned veteran, Steve Schneider, 5&4. Chris Bleile, who would make golf his livelihood for many years, would fall to Everman, 8&7 in 1987. The following year Everman turned back another champion, Billy Terry, 6&5. Then, in 1996, in a stroke play event, he topped who would be a two-time champion. Ben Wilkins, by 10 strokes.

While her brother was in Florida, Kelly, two years younger at 54, was consistently in the hunt for ladies titles, first at the Elks Club and then at Eagle Creek.

Her initial appearance in a finals was in 1998 against a lady that would end up with multiple titles, Carolyn Spaar, the latter winning a close match, 2&1.

Kelly would make the finals the following year and turn back Nancy Dilger, 4&2, the latter an eventual 10-time champion. She went back-to-back, winning again in 2000, nipping Spaar on the second hole of sudden death.

Second-place finishes, 3&2 to Nancy Tinker in 2001 and then to Dilger, 1-up, in 2003 followed. But in a 2004 in a match against Carol Payne, Everman won her third title, 4&3.

She would not win golf again, however. Finishing second by two shots to Nancy Tinker in 2005, second again in 2007, this time in sudden death to Dilger, and third in 2009 to both Dilger and Tinker. She did get to the finals again in 2010, but lost again to Tinker. Her last serious run was in 2012 when she finished third behind Lisa Nestor and Tinker.

“Golf is not as important to me as it once was,” Kelly admitted. “I remember the good times, the great ladies I played with. Those were great memories. Now, I play perhaps nine holes a week and if things don’t go well, I always have next week to try and do better.

“I will never forget the matches I had against Nancy Bleile,” Kelly stated. “It always seemed like we were pitted against each other in pivotal matches. Nancy is a tremendous competitor as was her mother. I still miss her.”

Water sports which is synonymous with Huron, Ohio residents, now takes up a lot of Kelly’s spare time.

“I have two grown children along with three grand-children,” Kelly explained. They all require time and if it means more time away from golf, so be it.”

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