no avatar

Southern States Stores hosting FFA fundraiser

• Mar 6, 2018 at 8:00 AM

Here is a roundup of recent agriculture-related press releases:

Southern States Stores hosting FFA fundraiser

Farm supply retailer Southern States Cooperative is holding a month-long fundraiser to help raise money for future farmers.

Southern States is holding an FFA Paper Emblem campaign where customers can donate $1 or more at checkout throughout the entire month of March and sign their name on an “I’m Supporting FFA” paper emblem

“Young farmers are the future of food production,” says Jeff Stroburg, president and CEO of Southern States. “As a farmer-owned cooperative, we take tremendous pride in investing in the young farmers of America and will continue to contribute to their development as future leaders in agriculture.”

The FFA mission is to make a positive difference in the lives of students by developing their potential for premier leadership, personal growth and career success through agricultural education. Half of all funds collected will benefit a local FFA chapter in the community; the other half will benefit the National FFA Foundation.

"We are deeply appreciative of Southern States and the company’s assistance to raise financial support for FFA and heighten community awareness about our organization," said National FFA Foundation President, Molly Ball. "Money donated by Southern States customers will help ensure that we’re able to continue to develop students’ leadership, growth and career success potential."

The campaign kicks off March 1st. For more information and participating locations, visit southernstates.com/FFA.

Southern States Cooperative sells farm and home supplies, including fertilizer, seed, livestock feed, animal health supplies, propane and lawn care supplies.

* * *

Buy your tickets today for Pork-a-Palooza

The Ohio Pork Council's Pork-a-Palooza, featuring: bacon, BBQ and beer, will be held from 1 to 7 p.m. Saturday, May 19 at the Delaware County Fairgrounds.

Join us for an afternoon of delicious pork products from your favorite local restaurants and food trucks. Dance the afternoon away with live music from Big Daddy Blue, or take part in one of our family-friendly activities!

* * *

New testing required for swine moving into and within Wisconsin

Swine moving into and within Wisconsin will have to meet new testing requirements beginning Feb. 1, State Veterinarian Dr. Paul McGraw announced. The new requirements are intended to help control the spread of two diseases: swine enteric corona virus disease, known as SECD, and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome, or PRRS. Both have caused significant hardship in the swine industry. Neither is a human health threat.

Like all animals, swine entering Wisconsin must be accompanied by a certificate of veterinary inspection, or CVI, signed by a veterinarian who has examined them in the past 30 days and found them to be apparently healthy.

In addition, the CVI must now include:

• A report showing that they came from a herd that has tested negative for the two diseases in the past 90 days.

• A veterinarian's statement that the animals showed no signs of either disease when they were examined.

• A statement from the event veterinarian, if they came through an out-of-state sale or exhibition where they were mixed with swine from other herds, that all the herds tested negative and that none showed signs of either disease.

Swine that don't meet these requirements can enter Wisconsin with a CVI and import permit from the Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection. However, they will be quarantined until a Wisconsin veterinarian has developed a herd plan addressing testing and biosecurity, and DATCP has approved the plan.

If the swine go directly to slaughter or to a veterinary clinic for treatment, or if they are returning from an out-of-state veterinary clinic, they do not need to be tested. Exhibitors who move swine into and out of the state for fairs or other exhibitions must notify DATCP. If their animals are potentially exposed to swine from positive herds at the events, they will be quarantined on return until they have a herd plan approved. They can get a herd plan approved before leaving the state, which may avoid a quarantine.

Swine moving within Wisconsin must now also test negative for PRRS and SECD within 90 days of movement, unless they're going to slaughter, either directly or after a terminal fair or show. For more complete details, visit https://datcp.wi.gov and search "swine movement".

* * *

ASA welcomes Northey's Senate confirmation

The American Soybean Association (ASA) congratulates Iowa Agriculture Secretary Bill Northey following his confirmation by the Senate earlier today as the U.S. Department of Agriculture's (USDA) Under Secretary for Farm Production and Conservation. Northey now awaits the formal swearing-in process. ASA President John Heisdorffer, a farmer from Keota, Iowa, issued the organization's congratulations via statement from the 2018 Commodity Classic in California.

"All of us at ASA are very happy for Bill. As an Iowa farmer, I've been fortunate to work collaboratively with him to move Iowa agriculture forward, and I'm excited to see him take his skills to USDA so that farmers can benefit nationwide.

"We'd like to thank the Senate for moving Bill's nomination forward. Specifically, Senators Chuck Grassley, Joni Ernst, Debbie Stabenow and Amy Klobuchar have been instrumental in not only gathering support for the nomination, but also working to move past those issues that have delayed his confirmation to date.

"USDA impacts not just farmers but all Americans on so many different levels, but we can't realize those impacts without good people like Bill in the right spots. As Under Secretary, Bill will be a great advocate for U.S. Soybean farmers and we look forward to working with him in this capacity."

* * *

NCGA and BASF invest in the future of the corn industry

The National Corn Growers Association and BASF awarded the William C. Berg Excellence in Agriculture scholarship to five aspiring college students pursuing degrees in an agriculture-related field at the 2018 Commodity Classic in Anaheim, Calif. The William C. Berg Excellence scholarship was created to honor William C. Berg, an Ohio farmer and retired postal worker who passed away in 2012.

“Agriculture is an exciting industry that is constantly changing, evolving and growing to meet society’s need for food, feed, fuel and a host of sustainable products. A new generation of leaders across multiple disciplines will be key to continued success,” said Kevin Skunes, NCGA President and corn grower from Arthur, N.D. “These scholarship winners show we can look forward to a bright future.”

Scholarships of $1,000 were awarded to the following students:

Nicole Gutzmann, from Raleigh, N.C.– a Ph.D. student at North Carolina State University pursuing a degree in entomology with a social science minor in genetic engineering and society.

Emily Kreinbrink, from Columbus, Ohio – a junior at The Ohio State University studying food science and technology.

Stephen Schwartz, from West Lafayette, Ind. – a sophomore at Purdue University studying agronomy with a focus in crop and soil management.

Santiago Tamagno, from Manhattan, Kan. – a graduate student at Kansas State University pursuing a Ph.D. in agronomy.

Samantha Teten, from Johnson, Neb. – a junior at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln studying agronomy.

The future of agriculture is bright, and there is no place where that light will shine brighter than at the BASF booth during the annual Commodity Classic tradeshow. The five NCGA winners will be joined by seven other agriculture leaders receiving scholarships by BASF in partnership with the American Soybean Association (ASA), the National Sorghum Foundation (NSF), the National Corn Growers Association (NCGA) and the National Wheat Foundation (NWF).

“The future of agriculture relies on passionate students who have a true desire to take part in advancing our industry,” said Scott Kay, BASF Vice President of U.S. Crop Protection. “I’m looking forward to seeing what our future holds knowing that we may have the privilege of one day employing these intelligent students at BASF.”

* * *

Consider Corn Challenge shines a light on corn’s growing potential in bio-economy

Six new technologies, that are poised to change the way the public perceives our country’s most abundant crop, were highlighted today in Anaheim, Calif. as winners of the inaugural Consider Corn Challenge, an open innovation contest hosted by the National Corn Growers Association. The diverse range of science unveiled shows that corn is squarely situated on the cutting-edge of technology, ready to support a wave of growth sweeping through the renewable products industry.

More than thirty, scientists and start-up companies answered the global call to bring forth their best ideas focused on the conversion of corn into bio-renewable chemicals. Contest entries reinforced that corn can improve the environmental footprint of many products used by consumers, including plastic bottles, acrylics, solvents, fibers, packaging, and coolants. Many of the submissions included bio-advantaged molecules, with the ability to deliver performance and value that exceeds petrochemicals.

The six winners of the competition are:

Lygos – The Berkley, CA company is producing Bio-Malonic™ acid (Bio-MA) from renewable sugars using cutting edge biotechnology. It is used today in diverse markets, including high-tech composites and coatings, electronics, flavors & fragrances, and pharmaceuticals. Traditionally Malonic Acid is currently made in China from petroleum, through an expensive process that employs hazardous chemicals. Lygos’ system uses non-toxic chemicals and mild conditions resulting in an environmentally friendly process with superior economics that can be deployed in the U.S.

Annikki - Technology to produce FDCA (furandicarboxylic acid), a replacement for petroleum derived terephthalic acid for plastic bottles, fibers, and nylons was the winning entry from the Chicago, Ill. company. FDCA is a versatile bio-advantaged molecule with the potential to replace 100 million tons of petrochemicals. FDCA is not only 100 percent renewable, it also provides superior performance properties. This allows plastic soda bottles to be lighter, use less energy in manufacturing and extend the shelf life for carbonated products.

Iowa Corn Promotion Board – This technology developed by Iowa corn farmers, is for the production of MEG (monoethylene glycol). MEG has a range of diverse applications from coolants and heat transfer fluid to packaging material. Today, many major consumer products groups are searching for ways to reduce their packaging’s environmental footprint and Iowa Corn’s bio-renewable MEG may be the answer. Millions of tons are produced annually with a value estimated to be more than $25 billion.

Vertimass – Vertimass of Irvine, CA, is seeking to produce aromatic chemicals using renewable corn ethanol to replace petrochemicals. The markets they are targeting are very large: 10’s of millions of tons, and a value in excess of $100 billion annually. This process represents a potentially very large new market, diversifying opportunities for ethanol plants and increasing corn utilization.

Sasya – Sasya, of Maple Grove, Minn, is producing methylmalonic acid which can compete in methyl methacrylate markets for making acrylic glass, and adhesives. The methyl methacrylate market is estimated to be 5 million metric tons and is worth more than $7 billion.

South Dakotas State University – SDSU’s efforts are focused using renewable precursors such as glycerol and lactic acid to make unsaturated polyester resins (UPRs). Today, UPRs are used to make large plastic tanks, as a binder in fiber glass sheets and other reinforced plastics.

“The renewables industry is already an important driver for the U.S. economy generating billions of dollars in revenue but the additional potential in the emerging bio-economy remains largely untapped,” said Bruce Peterson, chairman of NCGA’s Feed Food and Industrial Action Team. “NCGA is proud to showcase these great technologies. Continued improvements in sustainable corn production underscore corn’s ability to significantly improve the environmental footprint of many common household products.”

This year’s six winning projects were previewed at the 2018 Commodity Classic at the Anaheim Convention Center on Wednesday. Each winner will receive a U.S.$25,000 cash prize. NCGA will also explore additional opportunities to support contest entries throughout their development and/or commercialization. The contest generated 33 submissions from eight countries along with nearly 4,500 website visits from 82 countries.

“According to a USDA study from 2016, the U.S. bio-based products industry currently creates 4.2 million jobs and generates $393 billion in value added contributions to our economy, but there are many exciting market segments yet to be explored,” NCGA Director of Market Development Jim Bauman said.

“Today’s winners exemplify the potential for corn to play an ever-expanding role within the bio-economy. The ability to produce economically competitive, bio-advantaged molecules, compared to traditional petrochemicals, is driving many companies to review how corn can play a larger role in their future procurement strategy.”

Being immersed in the latest ideas and technology related to machinery, crop inputs and agronomic practices is expected at the annual Commodity Classic, Peterson noted, but it is especially meaningful to make this announcement of new, high potential corn uses at a time when farmers are facing another year of low prices.

“This challenge is geared to inspire new concepts, approaches and technologies that will help drive innovation and corn’s value. The growing productive capacity of corn farmers makes it essential that we continue to find innovative new ways to use this versatile crop,” said Peterson. “The Consider Corn Challenge will bring positive attention to our winners and help them move closer to commercialization. Likewise, our expectation is this Open Innovation competition will raise awareness of the capabilities and benefits of corn throughout the scientific community.”

NCGA and state corn associations actively support innovation in research, development and commercialization.

Recommended for You